The Begining

What is the best manner to begin a story?  Long long ago there lived a king …  or Once upon a time there lived a king …but all these are and sound so clichéd. Innovation that’s the mantra of today. Now how does someone innovate the beginnings .I mean beginnings must be the least complicated part of a story. What if the story begins with “The king lived many many years ago”…innovative is this? The custodians of the queen’s language will bay for the blood of the writer. Everyone who is or was alive lives or lived so what’s the big deal about it. If the king lived so did the queen, the courtiers, the people of the kingdom. Why only the king? How about “There lived a king and a queen together with the courtiers and the common people. Notice that the writer has already done away with the comma. No comma in the sentence means innovation .Poor fellow has already been plutoed from the language and that my dear friend spells INNOVATION in capital letters. The king the queen together with the courtiers and the common folks, all are alive and kicking and everything is hunky dory. This sounds as if the story has already ended on a happy note. Negative. The writer will strike it off from the list immediately. He doesn’t want the reader to get the feeling of a conclusion at the commencement, does he? Beginnings should remain neutral in texture and at the same time should initiate a hunger to know more, incite the reader to train his or her eye to the next sentence. But then one cannot do away with the fact that someone had to exist for a story to be narrated…so how about “There was a king and a queen and his courtiers and his subjects…But when? A few years ago or many years ago or centuries ago or eons ago or light years ago (if one is writing about science fiction) when? When? Time the most mystifying dimension begs to be vague if not specific. Poor writer is at the wits end.The time eh! How about “Long long ago there lived….” Oh no! Not again.

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